Pokeno beekeeper has 23 hive sites

6:07 PM Friday August 17, 2018 Paul Charman

Kiwi Beekeeper operates a total of 332 live hives which brokers say could grow to 500. Photo / Supplied

An established beekeeping business, operating hives on the rural fringes of Auckland, is now on the market for sale.

Link Broking Ltd’s Lynda Smyth is selling Kiwi Beekeeper — a Pokeno-based business That can offer both a quality honey brand and a long list of production assets.

Smyth points out that though the business is being sold as a going concern operation, it has primarily been priced on an assets basis.

The asking price for the business based at 14B Great South Rd, Pokeno, is $710,000, she says.

“Here’s the opportunity for a keen operator to pay reasonable money to take over an already established, first-rate operation. This includes Kiwi Beekeeper’s tangible assets of $496,430, intangible assets of $130,070 and stock of $83,500.

“The business offers strong well-constructed hives on 23 sites, and significantly it is ready to split and expand the hive numbers this spring,” says Smyth.

“There are a total of 332 live hives — 307 full depth double-storey hives and 25 full depth single-storey ones. Right now existing sites are capable of stocking more than 500 hives, and it is worth noting that amongst the huge range of assets included in this sale are all the elements required to create another 150 hives.

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The offer includes a big range of quality beekeeping equipment. Photo / Supplied

“Above all, the proposed sale offers the attractive possibility of owning the Kiwi Beekeeper brand, which is obviously one lending itself to establishing export sales. The logo and packaging design are very attractive and the website is well designed, so the opportunities to increase retail and wholesale sales are manifest.”

Getting down to nuts and bolts of the operation, Smythe says the business, established by the present owner in 2011, operates from leased premises at Pokeno, paying rent of $1881 per month. However it can be moved to new premises if desired.

“The sale includes a huge range of top quality equipment, including a Toyota Hilux fitted with custom aluminium tray and hive crane. A dual Box paraffin dipper, a 6.9m-high cube shipping container (RMP Certifiable), a 300 litre sugar tank and more than 700 supers are just some examples of the long list of assets that come with this sale.

“A super is the box in which 10 frames are hung. The bees collect nectar and store the processed nectar in honeycomb, which they build on the frames. When the honeycomb is full, the bees reduce the moisture content of the honey before capping the comb with beeswax. The beekeeper will then take the full honey supers and extract the honey.”

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Honey is sold through farmers markets, plus six retail outlets. Photo / Supplied

Smyth says stock includes premium New Zealand honey in retail packs and bulk drums as well as 280g cut honeycomb segments.

Retail products include manuka honey (100+ MGO); manuka blend (35+ MGO); creamed wildflower; creamed rewarewa; creamed clover and creamed bush blend honey.

As for the bio security aspects of beekeeping, this honey business has the advantage of never having had a positive test for AFB disease or Tutin contamination, says Smyth.

“Kiwi Beekeeper has a great location for producing cut comb honey because of the lack of Tutin.”

She says sales are now mostly through four farmers’ markets and six retail outlets. Weekend markets can bring in sales of $3000 per week, up to $5000 per week in peak season.

“However, there is huge potential to increase retail and wholesale sales as well as establish export sales.

“The reason for the sale is the owner intends to move overseas. His family will provide beekeeping training if desired and the vendor is offering a handover to introduce the purchaser to current buyers, suppliers, extractors and farm owners.”